Ways to Organize Your Shelves

I rearrange my bookshelves on a seasonal basis- at least. I acquire new books, or I get bored with the way my shelves look, so I change them. It’s something I do pretty frequently. Luckily, there are so many different ways to organize your shelves, and today I’m going to share 3 of them.

*All images used in this post were taken from Pinterest. They are not my own.

By Genre

This is how I typically have my shelves organized. I like this method of organizing because I’ve found it’s easiest for me to find a book I’m looking for. It’s also a good option for mood readers. You can see all of the fantasy books you have or all of the romance books you have, and choose from those sections. I also separate the books I have read from the books I haven’t read, and from there I split them into genres.

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It also helps with blogging because when I’m looking for specific books for recommendations, I can easily see all of a certain type of book in one section.

This can also be separated into sub-genres: first YA vs Adult vs Middlegrade, then into contemporary- romance, mystery, literary fiction, etc. vs fantasy- urban, dystopian, etc. Or it can even be divided into different tropes or elements!

Your shelves can be arranged in a variety of ways using this system, which is what makes it such a great option for most.

By Author’s Name

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This one’s for all my Ravenclaws.

Organizing alphabetically is something I’ve grown very accustomed to after both volunteering and working at a library. This can be combined with the previous one, or done on its own. It is pretty self-explanatory, but it means putting your books in order of the author’s last name from A-Z (or first name, if you prefer).

If you are good at memorizing an author’s name, this one might be perfect for you! I’ve had my bookshelves organized this way before and I loved it. I’m actually thinking of going back to this way because it’s such a nice system where there isn’t a lot of question over which book to put where.

With genre, it can be a little difficult to decide where to put certain if they fall into multiple genres, or if you only have one or two books from a genre. This one is simple- there isn’t that same room for confusion. Plus, all of your books from an author can be placed next to each other.

By Color

This is one that scares me, but I love the end result of so much. That is by turning your shelves into a rainbow! I’m sure you’ve all seen rainbow bookshelves before. They are a huge trend in the book community.

I love how these look. I personally just don’t think I have enough books for each color to be able to successfully do this. It also just stresses me out to have my authors and series separated.

But, if that doesn’t bother you and you are a visual person, this is perfect for you!

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Tell me, how do you have your bookshelves set up? I would love to know!

Jessica

How To Get More Reading Done Before the Year Ends! / Blogtober Day 30

We are nearing the start of the 11th month of the year, meaning we have just about 61 days left to read before 2020. Luckily, I have surpassed my Goodreads reading challenge this year. I wasn’t always so successful, though, and I know how hard it can be to get that last stretch of reading in.

As a busy college student, I’m always trying to find time in my schedule to fit in reading. I thought I would compile a small list of tips that help me read more and maybe they’ll help if you need to finish your reading goals for the year!

🖊Audiobooks are lifesavers

First up, before anyone feels the need to comment: audiobooks count as reading.

I used to never listen to audiobooks. I never really knew where to get them, and I found myself zoning out while it was playing. That all changed my junior year of high school. I started driving to school, which was a long time of me not doing anything. I decided to try out Audible, and I got two free credits. Soon, audiobooks became a necessity for me.

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I can still vividly remember listening to The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas and Turtles All the Way Down by John Green. Hearing the emotion from the voice actors made the story so much more powerful for me. I fell in love.

Now, I usually read one physical book, one e-book, and one audiobook. That way, I can basically be reading at all times. Audiobooks are great because you can listen to a book while cooking, cleaning, driving, etc. which is something you obviously can’t do with a physical book. You can also increase the speed (I usually listen at 2-2.5x’s) which makes the read feel shorter, too (even though 2-2.5 is typically the normal speed I would read the book if I were reading physically).

🖊Put it into your schedule

I started dedicating 15-30 minutes of reading at night. I made it part of my reading routine. I shower, put on my PJs, watch a bit of Netflix or Youtube while drinking a glass of water, and then I read until I’m tired.

This has helped increase the amount I read a lot. Now that it’s a habit of mine to read at night, I don’t get tempted to keep watching Netflix instead. I enjoy this time I have to just read. It’s super relaxing.

You don’t have to dedicate a specific time to read, though. Not everyone has a consistent schedule every day, so that might not work for you. You can tell yourself that you will read for 10 minutes every day instead. It doesn’t matter what time it is. Or you can make it part of your morning routine rather than night!

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🖊Never leave without a book

As I mentioned before, I read one physical book, one audiobook, and one e-book at once. This is just my preferred method, but obviously, that’s not necessary. It helps a lot to always have a book on my phone, though. When I’m in class and have some free time, I can pull out my phone to read. On my way to class, I listen to an audiobook. On a bus or long car ride, I bring a book with me.

When it’s accessible, you’ll always find some time to squeeze in a few pages. If you don’t bring a book with you everywhere you go, you might find yourself having free time that you just spend on social media or doing something else that’s not very productive.

🖊If you’re not enjoying it, DNF it

Reading a really painfully slow book that you’re just not into isn’t going to help. It might actually end up putting you in a reading slump because you won’t be motivated to finish. When you normally read one book a week, this one might take you months to finish. It’s not worth it sometimes.

Don’t be afraid to just DNF the book. DNF’ing doesn’t mean that you’ll never pick up the book again and that it’s automatically a bad book. It just means that it’s not working for you right now. Put it down. Pick up something different that will keep you excited about a story.

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Those are all of my tips today! They may seem a bit obvious, but a reminder is always helpful. What other ways do you get yourself to read more? Leave a comment letting me know!

Jessica

Things I Look For In Books – Tropes I Love / Blogtober Day 26

I never used to think about what kinds of things I liked in books. I would only think in terms of genres- I like dark contemporaries, urban fantasies, romance novels, etc. But recently, I started making a list of things that I’m usually drawn to in books (or reasons that I tend to rate a book 5 stars).

Some of these are tropes, some are just other random elements- but you’ll get it! This is also a bit similar to Kayla’s (@Booksandlala) video, so check that out, too.

🖊Morally grey characters

A character who makes questionable choices but also has a good reason for it and is sometimes an ass but has gone through it in the past? Give it to me. I love characters that you’re not sure if you’re supposed to hate or love. Or a character that you know you should hate but you actually feel bad for. One example of this is The Cruel Prince. I personally am not the biggest fan of this book, but I can totally see the appeal to Cardan. I mean, the title says it all- he’s cruel. But then we see parts of his life behind closed doors, and there’s a little bit of tragedy there.

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🖊Boarding schools

This is my all-time favorite setting. For a book. For a movie. Whatever it is, I love it. There’s just something so eerie about boarding schools. I just recently talked about this in a post where I gave book recommendations based on tv shows. Sanctuary Bay is such a good book, and it’s the one I mentioned. Another example is Truly Devious, which I also loved (and still need to read the rest of the series). There’s also Wilder Girls, which I LOVEd. And, of course, Harry Potter, which is probably one of the most well-loved series in the book community- and outside of it, too, for that matter.

🖊Flowery writing

The Starless Sea. The Night Circus. That’s it. That’s all I have to say for this one.

Ok, JK.

I love beautiful, poetic prose. Words that are so beautifully written they give you goosebumps. Maybe this is just the poet in me, but it’s almost vital to an all-time favorite book for me.

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🖊Unreliable narrators

This is such a good plot twist. Probably one of my favorites. I feel like this reveals too much in a story, so I won’t list any specific books. But there’s something so cool about a book convincing you that the main character is in the right and then BAM! You find out they are actually a pathological liar. Or they kept something super important from the reader. I would love to write a book with an unreliable narrator one day, but I feel like this is something so hard to do.

🖊Plot Twists

This is similar to the unreliable narrator (which is a type of plot twist, oftentimes), but I just love really good plot twists. When endings can actually surprise you, but also make so much sense for the story, it’s one of the best feelings. It’s just so satisfying, even if the book ends on a cliffhanger.

One example is Every Last Word. I really didn’t see the plot twist the first time I read it, and it still haunts me to this day. Looking for Alaska? That plot twist broke me. There are so many more that I also want to read (and many that I added just because I heard they had good plot twists).

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What do you think? Do you like any of the same tropes as me or do you have totally different ones? As I was writing this, I also realized I have so many other ones, so I might have to do a part 2 for this in the future.

Until tomorrow!

Jessica

On Mood Reading- A Discussion / Blogtober Day 22

I have always called myself a “mood reader.” When it’s spooky season, I want to read all of the dark and scary books. In the summer, I go for contemporaries. Sometimes I’m in the mood to only read fantasies for an entire month, and sometimes I can’t even decide what mood I am in, I just know that every single book I start I’m not in the mood for.

But this has become a problem. I always set TBRs for myself and then I don’t follow them. Or I have an ARC I need to read before publication, but I don’t feel like it’s the “right time.” I can’t even tell you how many books I’ve picked up only to read a couple of chapters and put them down again. I’ll get to it another time, I tell myself. And then I never do.

I’ve actually been trying to train myself to stop being a mood reader, which sounds weird, but it’s working.

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This month, I decided I wanted to ACTUALLY read all of the books on my TBR. Out of the 7, I’ve read 3 of them, and I’m in the middle of 2 more. I forced myself to pick them up and start reading them regardless of the fact that I wasn’t “in the mood.”

And guess what? I LOVED them and couldn’t put them down once I started. Not being in the right mood had nothing to do with my enjoyment of the book because if a book is good, I’m going to like it no matter if I read it in July or December.

Along with this, I realized that I need to keep my TBRs each month small and manageable. This way I can get through the books I have to read that month, but I still have room to pick up others I want to read at the moment. This month’s TBR was a bit ambitious since I’m in school and have a lot of assignments to do. In the future, I’ll probably keep my TBRs at 5 books. That’s a little over 1 a week.

Obviously, if I’m not liking a book on my TBR, I’m not going to force myself to finish it. I am all about DNF’ing books. And yes, sometimes I’m still going to put down a book simply because I’m not in the right mindset for it. But, I’m hoping that by training myself a bit more, I will be able to hit deadlines faster, finish all of the books I’ve intended to read, and maybe even discover some new favorites along the way!

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So tell me, are you a mood reader? How do you choose your next read?

Jessica

A Guide to Netgalley / Blogtober Day 16

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Ah, Netgalley. Both a blessing and a curse. This site has been the cause of much of my excitement but has also been a factor in my stress. Today I thought I’d talk about my personal tips for Netgalley, and how to get the most out of it!

If you’re not familiar with it, Netgalley is a site where bloggers and book reviewers can request ARCs in exchange for an honest review of the book. It’s a simple way for people, both with large and small followings, to get their foot in the door for ARCs.

It’s how I first began reading ARCs. It took a while before I first got accepted. But don’t be discouraged! I hope the following tips will help you land some ARCs (maybe even your first)!

Keep your profile updated.

Your profile should always be up to date with the most important information about you. Include links to your social media sites, your blog/Youtube channel (if you don’t have one of those, it’s fine), and anywhere else you post about books (like Goodreads). Include the stats of all of those (how many followers you have, how many views you get, etc.). Also, include any other relevant info. This can be the genres you like to read, your location, etc.

Publishers want to be able to see as much information about you in as fast a time as possible so they can continue on with their job. Putting all of this basic info into your bio makes it easier for them to make a decision about whether to approve you for the ARC or not. If they don’t see that info right away, they probably won’t go looking for it on their own, and instead, they will just move on to someone else. Don’t give them a reason to say no before they even consider you.

Request from smaller publishers first.

When you are just starting out on Netgalley, you probably won’t get accepted by Simon and Schuster or Penguin Teen. Don’t be offended or upset by this. It makes sense from a business standpoint. Start with some smaller publishing houses to build up your profile first.

Another thing that publishers look at is your feedback ratio (I’ll explain this more in the next point). If you have never been approved for any books, they don’t know how good you are at reviewing books in a timely manner. But don’t worry- many smaller publishers still accept accounts with no feedback ratio, so start there!

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Eventually, you can work your way up to bigger publishers and may even be auto-approved by some (meaning you have unlimited access to all of the titles they post and don’t need to go through the waiting process).

But don’t request too many books.

Going back to the feedback ratio- the publishers can see how many books you’ve requested, how many you’ve been approved for, how many you were denied for, and how many you’ve reviewed. This all ties into your feedback ratio- this is the number of books you’ve been approved for to the number of books you’ve provided a review for (or feedback).

For example, if you’ve been approved for 4 books, but you only reviewed 2 of them, your feedback ratio will be 50%. If you’ve reviewed 3 of them, your ratio will be 75%. The higher your ratio, the better your chance of getting approved. Netgalley recommends a ratio of 80% or higher, but I’d say try to keep it above 70%.

That being said, don’t go crazy and request every single book on Netgalley. Chances are you’ll be accepted for a lot more than you thought you would, and you’ll be stuck with a really low ratio, and will most likely not be able to review all of the books before publication. This is also unfair to reviewers who would love the chance to review a certain book but were unable to because spaces filled up.

So, stick to only those you are truly interested in and know you will read soon! Trust me, it makes life so much easier. I know it’s tempting, and I’ve fallen into the requesting trap myself, but don’t make the same mistakes I did.

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I hope these tips were at least a little bit helpful! Let me know what other advice you have for Netgalley users as well! We can all learn from each other :)

Jessica

The Perfect Reading Nook / Blogtober Day 5

Before we get into today’s post, I just want to make a little announcement!

I am going to be doing a 24 hour read-a-thon TOMORROW! If you want to join me, feel free to start at midnight in your timezone on October 6th! Be sure to follow me on Instagram and Twitter for updates as well!

Today’s post is based off of the Day 4 Blogtober prompt by The Library Looter. It was yesterday’s prompt, but I still wanted to do it! I even created an aesthetic board to describe the perfect reading nook for me!

*All pictures were taken from Pinterest. They are not my own.

reading nook aesthetic

The first (and most important) thing for me would be a big window in my reading room. Natural lighting is a necessity for me when reading (and it’s great when taking pictures, too). My room at home is in the basement, so I definitely don’t get good lighting down there. Ideally, I’d love to have it.

Also, I would need tons and tons of comfy blankets and pillows. When you’re sitting and reading for a long time, you need to be comfortable. I’d also want a few different chairs around the room so I can change up my location or have mini reading parties with friends and everyone can be comfortable!

Going along with the blankets, it would be so nice to have a fireplace in the reading room, too. This is mostly for the ambiance, but also adds that extra warmth in the wintertime. I don’t have a fireplace in my house anymore, and it’s probably one of the things I miss most.

Plants would also be super cute and would add some life to the room. Even fake plants are always a nice addition, and I try to have them everywhere.

And finally, I would need to have lots of books! In a perfect world, I’d have a huge collection, but that’s not something I absolutely need. I would at least need a pile of 5 unread books at a time to choose from (either bought or borrowed from the library) because I am a mood reader!

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And that’s it- This is my perfect reading nook! Let me know what you would want in your ideal reading spot because I think it’s so interesting.

Jessica

Classics I Want to Read

Not everyone likes to read classics. Some find them boring, hard to read, etc. However, I think they are super important to literature, so I try to pick them up every once in a while. There are quite a few I hope to read during my lifetime, but here are five that I am most interested in right now.

1984 by George Orwell

This is the only classic on this list that I currently own- it’s a terrifying dystopian story that takes place in a future where you are not allowed to have your own thoughts. It is a scary world to think about, but the scariest part is that it is not entirely impossible. I have heard really amazing things about this one, and since I own it, I really have no excuse not to read it soon.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Hundreds of tv shows and movies reference this book over and over, and I never understand them. It follows four sisters and the conflicts they go through during the civil war in New England. Also, a movie is coming out at the end of this year, and I refuse to watch it until I read the book. But that probably won’t be for a while.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

I’m sure you all know the story of Frankenstein, at least in basic terms. Frankenstein’s monster is a popular icon in our society. I want to read the actual story because I love gothic literature and this definitely falls under that. Plus, we are officially entering spooky season, so maybe I’ll find time to squeeze this one in.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

I love the tv show that was adapted from this book. It is so good. And how cool is it that we are alive at the same time as the author of a modern classic. Atwood’s second book in this series has actually just come out as well, so I am excited to read the first one and then see where the second one takes us.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Last (but most certainly not least) is a book my friend read and adored. It is such an important story, and I absolutely need to read it. I also want to watch the movie (which I will probably do regardless of if I read the book first or not). I know I will absolutely love this book, though I have heard it deals with a lot of violence, so be aware of that going in.

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Do you like reading classics? What are some of your favorites (so that I can add them to my list!)?

jessica

I Actually Like Movie Tie-In Covers? // Discussion

Hello loves! Hope you are having a great day/night/week!

Today I wanted to talk about a topic that I have discussed a little bit on Twitter, but never in much detail: movie tie-in covers.

A lot of people have an issue with them, but personally, I love them! I thought I would talk a little bit about why I like them and then share my favorites with you (plus some not-so-great ones at the end).

Okay, let’s start off with the big one- “they’re ugly.”

I completely disagree with this one. There are so many beautiful movie tie-in covers, and some are actually prettier than the original cover!

For example…

 

 

 

 

(I don’t know if this last one is actually being sold, but I found it on book depository so I’m assuming. Also, I know a lot of people hate movie poster covers but I love this movie so much that it’s the exception, ok?).

From a promotional standpoint (wow the PR major in me is jumping out), it is a great tactic to get more people interested in a book. Someone may see the book on a shelf and remember that they watched the movie, and this could get them to read it! Or maybe they’ve seen the trailer for the movie, so they want to pick up the book first.

People buy book = money for publisher/author/everyone involved. Yay!

Also, if the book is one of your favorites, it is cool to own another edition of it. I love to collect different editions of my favorite books, so if it gets turned into a movie, I want to celebrate that somehow. This is just a personal opinion, though!

Now, I know that not all movie-tie in editions are pretty (there are some really bad ones), but there aren’t really any downsides to them.

You always have the option of buying the original cover (and the price for it usually goes down, which is always a bonus). You don’t lose anything, but others may gain something! No harm done.

Here are some examples where I prefer the original cover:

 

 

 

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What are your opinions on movie tie-in editions? Do you like them, hate them, or not have an opinion? Leave a comment down below, and let me know what your favorite (or least favorite) is!

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Are Trigger Warnings Important? // Discussion

This post was originally meant to go up a couple weeks ago, but due to the amount of research and time I wanted to put into it, I had to postpone a little bit! I’m really sorry about that, but I hope that this post was informative and useful in some way. Feel free to leave any comments sharing your personal experiences, or correct anything I say if it is wrong! I want this to be as correct as possible.

I recently came across a tweet that said that trigger warnings in books are unnecessary and that they are “spoilers.”

I was stunned when I saw this because I thought that this debate was over a long time ago. Personally, I do not have any triggers that would prevent me from reading a book, but I still find the value in including them. I want to dive deeper into this topic and explain why they are important.

Aside from my personal beliefs, I also read actual research to support my claims like I stated earlier, and at the end of this post I will have a list of some of the sites that I read- both for and against the use of them.

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What is a trigger warning?

A trigger warning is a statement at the beginning of a book, tv-show, movie, etc. that lists some of the potential “triggers,” or sensitive topics covered in the media, that could be harmful to the viewer. This is especially important for trauma survivors and those with PTSD.

What is the value?

Some researchers stated that trigger warnings could be harmful to those with PTSD in the long run because it causes them to avoid those traumas, rather than dealing with them. However, no research has been done with actual trauma survivors to determine whether trigger warnings are helpful or counterproductive.

It is not a healthy coping mechanism to avoid triggers.

That is not what I am trying to say in this post. If you suffer from PTSD, I urge you to seek help and go through the treatment process. 

However, what we do know, is that trigger warnings can be helpful if someone is just recovering from trauma, and can not yet be exposed to those triggers without severe mental strain. Also, if someone is experiencing a time of poor mental health, they can know to avoid certain media if it will be triggering for them.

Additionally, these content warnings do not necessarily cause someone to avoid the trigger; Instead, it may allow them to prepare mentally for them, rather than catching them off guard and causing a panic attack.

But what if I get spoiled by a trigger warning?

First, trigger warnings are not spoilers. Trust me. Just by looking up a review or reading the description of a book or movie, you’ll probably find the topic mentioned.

Also, trigger warnings are general enough that they are more or less themes featured in the books, not plot points.

If you are someone who doesn’t like to know anything about a book or movie before going in, then just skip the trigger warnings.

You may find them unnecessary, but that does not mean that they are not necessary for someone else. Keep that in mind when you see a content warning of some kind. If you don’t see the point, that is because they are not meant for you.

Research and Resources:

Psychology Today Article

Time Article

NYT Article– Read the comments of this one as well!!

PTSD Counseling Resources

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I hope that you found this post at least somewhat helpful. Once again, feel free to correct me if I said anything wrong in the comments. This post is meant to be informative, so I want to make sure the information is as accurate as possible.

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My Reading Tastes Have Changed… & So Has the Way I Rate Books

Hello, loves! Jess here. Notice anything new? I recently changed my site name, as well as my Instagram and Twitter handles! I wanted to “rebrand” in a way because my old name just didn’t encompass what this site is. I wanted a name that fits this blog and me! Kisses From Jess is now in the past :)

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What does this change mean? Basically nothing.

Like I said, I mainly just wanted a name that fits what this blog is- and that’s what Jessica C Writes does. I write. About books, writing, journaling, and a couple other things. As far as content, the type of things I post will stay the same, but I am going to be putting a lot of effort into those posts. I want each and every post to be something I am proud of. So that is going to be my aim for this coming year (oh- and expect more book reviews).

Anyways…

Let’s move onto what you clicked for- which is a discussion post about how my reading tastes have changed, but more specifically how it has changed my ratings!

I wrote a post about how I read both critically and for fun a few months ago, but my opinions have definitely changed on that subject since then.

I realized that (especially in the last few months) my reading tastes have been changing dramatically. What I used to read were mainly YA contemporaries- very fluffy ones. I had the occasional thriller or fantasy or adult book thrown in there, but I basically just stuck to one genre that I knew I loved.  And there’s nothing wrong with that.

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But the truth is, I didn’t really know what I liked in books and what I didn’t because I was only reading one type of book. Within the past few months, I wanted to change this. I wanted to pick up different books so that I could figure out what I like.

I now pick up books that are very different from what I was reading just a couple years back. Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t suddenly become a huge high fantasy or science fiction reader, but I stray outside of the YA contemporary romance books. I read mysteries and thrillers, and lots of NA and Adult books! I also add a lot more fantasy novels to my TBRs than I have in the past!

Overall, I have definitely broadened my horizons when it comes to reading, and I am so happy about that!

How has this affected my reviews?

Because I now know what I like to see in books- in terms of themes, genres, character development, etc., I read more critically. I am very picky about what I like and what I don’t like, so I don’t give everything 4 or 5 stars anymore as I previously had for no reason whatsoever. I basically just gave everything 5 stars as long as I somewhat enjoyed it.

With that in mind, I am also pickier about what I read to begin with- I don’t add books to my TBR just because they are extremely hyped by the book community. I only add books that I have a genuine interest in reading now. So even though I said I give less 4/5 stars, that doesn’t mean the book is necessarily bad. It still had something in it that drew me to it, it just isn’t one of my all time favorites.

Mainly, I am just pickier about what I choose as my favorite books opposed to just good books.

For example- a rating between 4-5 means a book is amazing and I really, really love it. It has definitely earned a spot in my top favorites.

However, a book with 3-4 stars does not mean the book is bad- there was just certain elements that fell flat for me, or I was a little disappointed by it. For example, I might not have liked the writing style, but loved the story. Or the pacing was slow but I loved the characters, etc. This is still a book I enjoyed though!

I think most people see a 3 star rating and assume a book is bad, when that is not the case for me at all. It all definitely depends on each reviewer and how they rate their books, but I think in general a 3 star rating is not equal to a book being awful.

I rarely give 1-2 stars, but those are the books that I consider “bad.”

By experimenting with my reading tastes, I have definitely turned into a much more critical reader. Reading critically is something I really enjoy, and I’ve always been this way with books for school, so I don’t know why it has taken me this long to be this way with other books.

This post is getting pretty long, so I’ll end it there!

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Have your reading tastes changed at all? How/Why? This is a topic I could go on about for days, and it’s super interesting to hear other people talk about! Definitely leave a comment letting me know your opinions on this down below :)

See you soon!

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